Choreographer Diego Gil and Christoph Brunner are collaborating on Gil’s project “Collective Writing Machines” for the Ausufern Festival at the Uferstudios Berlin on 31 August, 2013. Two perofrmances with limited spots (20 each) will take place at 3 and 5 p.m.

Image: Pablo Fontdevial

Singing and signing words continuously in a paper as they emerge from mouth to paper (and back), suspensions may happen only to make us feel the micro momentum of the next impulse to start again

Collective Writing Machines is a choreographic practice built in the intersection of writing, thinking and perceiving focusing on the emergent quality produced by these activities.

The main concern of this project is the intersection of language and sensation (sensation as the perception of perceiving) seen as a movement of emergence that launches embodied experiences toward potentiality rather than stratification.

In each occasion, a “temporary collective” takes form through multiple differential circuits of sensations enticed through the bodies and what is shared is a complex web of transmitted perceptions rising from the fold of intelligibility.

For Ausfurn festival, small  groups of participants will put into practice writing and walking techniques enticing a sensitive relationship with the environment. We will write and walk briefly while strolling through places around the Uferstudios building.

Text: Diego Gil

Concept and performance: Diego Gil and Christopher Brunner

Advise and assistance: Pablo Fontdevila

Duration: 35 minutes approx.

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Practices of Experimentation: Research and Teaching in the Arts Today is the new book I co-edited. It comprises articles and artwork from members of the Department in Art  & Media at Zurich University of the Arts. The title alludes to an approach we have been fostering throughout the book: How to not make a book not on the level of representation and about what people stand for (i.e. their discursive positioning) but to activate what is happing? Aligning with Isabelle Stengers’ concept of “ecologies of practices” the book wants to think through what is happening - thus foregrounding practices and what they can do or might become rather than what they are in a representational manner. The result is a fine mesh of interrelations and open threads allowing for novel assemblages every time you start engaging with the material. The book unfolds into five “materials” (or subject matter): 1) Laboratory-Experiment, 2) Interfaces, 3) Art-Theory-Science, 4) Teaching-Research, 5) Carte Blanche. The latter “material” comprises  four contributions from authors outside the department: Ute Meta Bauer (MIT), Heiner Goebbels (University of Giessen), Germán Toro-Pérez (ZHdK) and Richard Wentworth (Royal College Art). To give you a better idea, below you find the table to contents.

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food

I just finished reading a publication coming out of the 1999 exhibition by White Columns on Gordon Matta-Clark’s collaborative work with Caroline Goodden entitled Food. The most moving part was a letter from Caroline Goodden to Corinne Diserns describing the development of Food:

Food was born out of the hunger for change and the excitement of experimentation. ln a decade where avantgarde dance was saying “Take us of the precious procenium stage,” sculpture was saying, “Get us out of pristine white-walled galleries.” While artists in general were saying, “Let us live and work in some space (i.e. lofts),” some of us were saying “lets have some food!” In other words….change needed. Different space,different stimulation, different food.

Building on this excitement of experimentation a new model of inhabiting a space and time of collective creative practice across different modes of life strikes me a particularly enjoyable and inspiring practice. the reason I get so enveloped by the experiment of food lies in the absolute obvious relation Goodden makes between diverging practices of economy, survival, creative practice, community and acts of creation. From my point of view she outlines a mode of collective that includes manifold layers of life and starts from this relational nexus instead of just patching existing discourses together. In the end, it is not that important if the place was not sustainable. As Goodden points out:

The joy is the idea. The idea, as an idea, worked. It was a beautiful, nourishing, vital, stimulating new concept which was a living, pulsating hub of creative energy and piles of fresh parsley

The fact that an idea works and lives is the most enriching aspect I have experienced in my engagements with North-American and Canadian ethico-aesthetic experimentations. Working at an art school in Zurich, one of the largest hubs for art-object capital turnover, gives me an idea where I would draw lines of experimentation and invention that move and don’t leave a stone untouched and other ‘artistic’ practices that play safe games of accumulation. What might we be able to do with experimentation to radicalize in a manner that it concerns life and the potential for new modes of life? How can we make an idea work as an idea?

FOOD